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Important COVID NEWS from MARC

Help slow the spread of COVID-19 and preserve hospital capacity

Public health departments have been working with our metro’s hospital systems in strong collaboration since COVID-19 entered our region. We have appreciated this partnership which is imperative for a safe and health community.

Today we heard several concerns voiced from our region’s hospital Chief Medical Officers. Due to COVID-19, our hospitals are at a critical juncture between concern and crisis.

“Bed capacity is a significant concern. Hospitals reported becoming aware recently that the hospital data available regarding bed capacity and utilization is not aligning with what hospital staff see in their wards and units every day. We were pleased to hear they will be working hard to remedy that and provide more usable, real world data about the availability of staffed beds that can be used for COVID-19 patients to help health departments and elected officials make recommendations and decisions to protect our community” states Dr. Sanmi Areola, director of the Johnson County Department of Health and Environment.

Hospital infection control is at an all-time high and hospitals are protecting staff and patients from COVID-19 spread in their facilities. However, the growing level of community spread is also impacting bed capacity by reducing staff availability due to staff being exposed to COVID-19 out in the community.

Hospitals are growing increasingly concerned about having to delay procedures, treatments and surgeries for patients who truly need them. Delayed or deferred care can create bad outcomes for patients, their families and the community.

The public plays an important role in slowing down our region’s current widespread transmission of COVID-19. It is more imperative than ever to:

  • Wear masks.
  • Physically distance (6 feet or more) from others you don’t live with.
  • Stay home if you are sick.
  • Avoid crowded indoor gatherings at homes, restaurants, bars and other event venues where transmission is more likely to occur.
  • Practice good hand hygiene.

Taking this information seriously is something each member of our community can do to help slow the spread of COVID-19 and ease the pressure on our region’s hospitals.

###

For the complete article, click below

http://www.marc2.org/htmlemail/PublicHealth/COVID-19_hospital-capacity.htm

Polling locations for Nov. 2020 election in Raytown

Prec. 

1,2,3,4 Raytown Central Middle School 10601 E 59th St

5,7       Our Lady of Lourdes Church 7045 Blue Ridge Blvd

6,10      Raytown City Hall 10000 E 59th St

8          Connection Point at First Baptist Church 10500 E State Route 350

9 **      Laurel Hills Elementary 5401 Lane Ave

11,15    Raytown South Middle School 8401 E 83rd St

12,13,14 *** Raytown South High School 8211 Sterling Ave

16         Southwood Church of the Nazarene 8201 Raytown Rd

17 ***    Raytown South High School 8211 Sterling Ave

18         Southwood United Church of Christ 7904 Raytown Rd

19 ***   Raytown South High School 8211 Sterling Ave

20 **     Laurel Hills Elementary 5401 Lane Ave

 

Below is a precinct map of Raytown for those who do not know which precinct they live in. It also should be on the card you got from the election board. 

Fire Saturday night at Temple Heights Manor

A fire broke out at about 9 pm Saturday in a sixth floor apartment of Temple Heights Manor, killing one person and sending many others to the hospital for smoke inhalation. 

For more on this Click HERE to read the KSHB 41 coverage. 

 

 

AMENDEMENT 3 LEGISLATIVE REDISTRICTING

AMENDEMENT 3 LEGISLATIVE REDISTRICTING

OVERVIEW

Amendment 3 seeks to repeal the Clean Missouri redistricting reforms Missouri voters overwhelmingly ratified in 2018 that give the job of drawing new state legislative districts to a non-partisan state demographer and establish constitutional criteria that require districts to be drawn in a way that maximizes partisan fairness and competitiveness while minimizing the number of “safe” districts dominated by one political party.

Under Amendment 3, redistricting commissions consisting of members handpicked by the state Democratic and Republican parties would draw new districts. Creating districts that are competitive and fair would no longer be a top priority.

In addition, Amendment 3 would exclude children and other residents who aren’t eligible to vote from being counted for redistricting purposes, deviating from the practice of counting all residents that Missouri and every other state has followed since the nation’s founding. The change could result in some lawmakers representing substantially more actual residents than others, thus granting some communities disproportionate representation.

Republicans strongly opposed Clean Missouri and immediately after its ratification pledged to make repealing it a top priority. The Republican-controlled General Assembly placed Amendment 3 on the Nov. 3 statewide ballot with the passage of Senate Joint Resolution 38. The Senate approved it on Feb. 10 by a vote of 22-9 with a lone Republican joining unanimous Democrats in opposition. The House of Representatives voted 98-56 to grant SJR 38 final passage on May 13. Fourteen House Republicans opposed the measure while just one Democrat supported it.

Amendment 3 includes other provisions unrelated to redistricting that are included as enticements to win voter support. One would replace an existing $5 cap on the value of lobbyist gifts to lawmakers with a flat ban in most instances. The other would lower the limit on campaign contributions to Senate candidates from $2,500 per election to $2,400, while leaving contributions to House candidates unchanged at $2,000.

The coalition that championed ratification of the Clean Missouri amendment two years ago has mobilized to oppose Amendment 3, which opponents dub Dirty Missouri. As of Sept. 28, there had been no visible campaign in support of Amendment 3. While the Missouri Farm Bureau on Sept. 23 established a campaign committee to advocate for the measure’s passage, given the late stage of the election cycle, it’s unclear how aggressively Farm Bureau will engage and how much of an impact its efforts will have.

BALLOT LANGUAGE BATTLE

Although the Secretary of State’s Office usually prepares the ballot language for measures placed before voters, the General Assembly exercised its statutory prerogative to write its own ballot question as part of SJR 38. However, the Clean Missouri group immediately sued, alleging the legislature’s language was deceptive and intentionally designed to mislead voters.

The final ballot language prepared by the Western District panel, followed by the official fiscal estimate prepared by the State Auditor’s Office, which was neither challenged nor judicially altered, says:

Shall the Missouri Constitution be amended to:

• Ban gifts from paid lobbyists to legislators and their employees;

• Reduce legislative campaign contribution limits;

• Change the redistricting process voters approved in 2018 by: (i) transferring responsibility for drawing state legislative districts from the Nonpartisan State Demographer to Governor-appointed bipartisan commissions; (ii) modifying and reordering the redistricting criteria.

State governmental entities expect no cost or savings. Individual local governmental entities expect significant decreased revenues of a total unknown amount.

Because Attorney General Eric Schmitt, a Republican, declined to appeal to the Missouri Supreme Court on behalf of the state, the Western District’s rewrite is final and is what voters will see on the Nov. 3 ballot.

 

CLEAN MISSOURI REVIEWED

From 1966 until 2018, partisan commissions consisting of equal numbers of Democrats and Republicans got first crack at drawing new state legislative districts following each decennial U.S. Census. There were two separate commissions, one charged with drawing the 34 Senate districts with the other dedicated to creating the 163 House districts.

Although the governor appointed the commissions, he was required to pick members from lists of party loyalists submitted by the state Democratic and Republican parties, so his role in shaping the commissions’ membership was limited. If the partisan commissions failed to agree, which happened more often than not, the task passed to a special commission of six Missouri Court of Appeals judges chosen for the job by the state Supreme Court.

Clean Missouri, which voters ratified with 63 percent support in November 2018, created a new position of non-partisan state demographer and put that person in charge of legislative redistricting. The demographer is chosen by the top Democratic and Republican Senate leaders from among the applicants for the post. If the two leaders fail to agree, they can each eliminate one-third of the applicants from consideration, and the demographer is chosen by random lottery from among the remaining applicants.

While the partisan commissions still exist under Clean Missouri, their role is limited to reviewing the maps produced by the demographer. A commission can amend the demographer’s plan, but only if at least 70 percent of its members agree. If no changes are approved, then the redistricting maps are finalized as presented.

Under Clean Missouri, the top criteria for drawing districts is “partisan fairness,” which is meant to ensure that the number of legislative seats a given party holds is roughly equal to that party’s statewide popular vote total. The secondary goal is to enhance competitiveness to maximize the number of districts that are winnable by either party and minimize the number of districts where one party is dominant.

As has always been the case with previous redistricting systems, Clean Missouri requires districts to be roughly equal in population and consist of contiguous territory. While compact districts are preferred, compactness is subservient to other criteria.

If not replaced by Amendment 3, the Clean Missouri system is scheduled to be used for the first time next year when the process for creating new districts based on the results of the 2020 U.S. Census gets underway. The revised legislative districts will be used starting with the 2022 elections and ending with the 2030 elections.

PROPOSED AMENDMENT 3 CHANGES

Amendment 3 would eliminate the position of state demographer and restore the authority of the partisan House and Senate redistricting commissions. As with the pre-Clean Missouri system, if one or both of those commissions fail to agree on new district maps, then the redistricting task would be kicked to a six-member judicial commission chosen by the Supreme Court.

While the partisan fairness and competitiveness criteria would remain under Amendment 3, they would be the least important considerations when drawing new maps, with the focus instead on compactness and trying to keep districts entirely within municipal and county boundaries. Amendment 3 would allow for a deviation of up to 15 percent from the ideal when determining partisan fairness, which critics say could substantially exacerbate partisan gerrymandering.

Amendment 3 would delete an existing constitutional requirement that legislative districts be based of the total population of the state as determined by the last U.S. Census and replace it with amorphous language saying “districts shall be drawn on the basis of one person, one vote.” During legislative debate over SJR 38, the measure’s supporters said this change is intended to ensure that only eligible voters are counted when crafting new legislative districts, even though those excluded would still be entitled to representation. Such a limitation would prevent children, non-citizens and other Missouri residents who for whatever reason aren’t eligible to vote from being counted, thus arbitrarily skewing the populations of legislative districts.

In the event either the partisan or judicial redistricting commissions produced maps that violated constitutional requirements, Amendment 3 would erect new barriers to filing legal challenges by limiting who can bring such a challenge and severely restricting the ability of courts to declare redistricting plans unconstitutional. To have legal standing to challenge a redistricting plan, a voter would have to prove they would be individually harmed by it – a high legal bar – instead of merely showing a plan violated constitutional requirements.

During the last redistricting cycle in 2012, the state Supreme Court ruled a Senate map crafted by the appellate commission repeatedly violated a constitutional prohibition against splitting counties unless a county has enough population for more than one district. After tossing out the Senate map, the high court ordered the redistricting process to start over. Such a lawsuit might not be successful under Amendment 3’s restrictions on litigation.

ARGUMENTS IN SUPPORT OF AMENDEMNT 3

Missouri voters didn’t understand what they were voting on in 2018 and deserve a chance to reconsider before the next redistricting cycle in 2021.

The 2018 redistricting system will result in sprawling districts that connect areas with little in common. Amendment 3 will prevent that from happening.

Legislative districts should be drawn to represent specific local communities and the people who live in them, not carve up communities to achieve idealistic goals.

Clean Missouri was designed to ensure that more Democrats are elected to the legislature, giving them through the redistricting process what they have been unable to achieve at the ballot box.

There are no safeguards to ensure the so-called “non-partisan” state demographer doesn’t draw new districts that favor one party over the other.

Redistricting is too important a task to entrust to the judgment of a single, unelected person.

For more than five decades, Missouri legislative districts were drawn either by bipartisan commissions or appellate judges, and the system worked well. Amendment 3 would restore that system.

Requiring districts to be drawn based on “one-person, one vote” will provide better representation by focusing them on the number of eligible voters instead of total population.

ARGUMENTS IN OPPOSITION TO AMENDMENT 3

Missouri voters decisively said just two years ago that they wanted to reform the state’s legislative redistricting process to eliminate partisan gerrymandering. Their decision should be respected.

For Republicans to attempt to repeal the new redistricting system before it has even had a chance to be implemented is unconscionable and shows they fear that fair and competitive legislative districts will threaten their hold on power.

Clean Missouri constitutionally requires a non-partisan state demographer to draw districts that are competitive and fair without regard to partisan interests. Amendment 3 will return to a system that is controlled by the two major political parties for the benefit of the parties.
Republicans are willing to resort to deception in an attempt to trick voters into ratifying Amendment 3 by writing ballot language that completely failed to mention its primary purpose of repealing the Clean Missouri redistricting reforms.

Two separate courts declared the Republican legislature’s ballot language to be false and misleading and ordered it to be rewritten.

Provisions highlighted in the ballot language that reduce the value lobbyist gift to lawmakers from $5 to $0 and slightly reduce the maximum campaign contribution to Senate candidates are included in Amendment 3 solely to distract voters from its changes to the redistricting process.

Amendment 3 will exclude children and others who aren’t eligible to vote from being counted for redistricting purposes, denying fair representation to all Missourians who reside in undercounted districts.

Instead of requiring legislative districts to be fair and competitive, Amendment 3 would allow for partisan germanders that are even worse than what Missouri had under its old redistricting system.

Raytown Democratic Association Primary endorsements

Victim’s family anxious after Raytown murder suspect released on house arrest

Tynan Mullen is charged with first-degree murder  of 19 year old Riley McCrackin. Mullen and three others killed  McCrackin behind the pool hall in Downtown Raytown.

Click HERE for more information on this from Fox4.

Absentee Ballot information

Raytown Library Closed due to COVID-19

The Mid-Continent Public Library Raytown Branch will be closed until further notice due to potential COVID-19 exposure.

Photo of Raytown Library

Music Night Patriotic Sing-along Tonight 6:30 pm Church Parking lot

Men Charged in Connection to Shooting That Left Teen Dead

From Raytown Police Dept

The Office of Jean Peters Baker, Jackson County Prosecuting Attorney, has charged two men in connection with a shooting that left a teen dead. Michael Richardson, an 18-year-old Kansas City man, was charged with Unlawful Use of a Weapon, Unlawful Possession of a Firearm, and Armed Criminal Action. Sean Hill Jr., a 21-year-old Grandview man, was charged with Unlawful Use of a Weapon and Armed Criminal Action. The charges stem from a shooting in Raytown on 06-30-2020, which left a teenage male dead.

From Jackson County Prosecutor

According to court records, Raytown police responded on June 30, 2020, to the 6200 block of Blue Ridge Boulevard on a reported shooting and found a deceased 15-year-old victim in the parking lot. A second person nearby was wounded by gunfire. Seven persons were soon found in a nearby vacant building. Video surveillance showed that three of them had tampered with evidence at the scene prior to Raytown Police arriving there. Richardson, who was among those in the vacant building, told police detectives that he discharged a weapon. Hill also acknowledged he had a gun and when asked about the shooting stated, “Don’t y’all shoot at …when they shoot at y’all? Ain’t that how it’s supposed to go?”

The fatal shooting of the 15-year-old victim and the wounding of another victim Tuesday night remain under investigation.

Click HERE for a link to the charging documents from the Jackson County Prosecutor

Michael Richardson

Sean Hill Jr.

Shootings Leave One Teen Dead

 At about 8:30 p.m., tonight (June 30, 2020,) Raytown Police responded to multiple calls of shots fired in the area of Raytown Plaza, a shopping center in the 6100 block of Blue Ridge Boulevard. Upon arriv

al, police officers found a teen male who had been shot and was deceased. He was at a smoke shop near the corner of East 63 Street and Blue Ridge Boulevard. Police also found two adult males at the opposite end of the shopping center, who were transported to an area hospital. One of those two males had been shot, but it was unknown if the other male had been shot. Their condition was unknown.

The investigation is ongoing. Anyone with information about the incident is asked to call the TIPS Hotline, 816-474-TIPS (8477.)

2001 Raytown, Missouri Homicide – Reward Increase

The Raytown, Missouri Police Department and the Greater KC Crime Stoppers TIPS Hotline are seeking the public’s help in identifying those responsible for the November 15, 2001 homicide of Craig Lasley in the 8600 block of Oxford Avenue.

Mr. Lasley (pictured) was found deceased in his home. An additional reward has recently been added to the case bringing the current reward up to a possible $5,000.00 for anonymous information leading to a felony arrest or charges.

Anyone with information is urged to contact Crime Stoppers Greater Kansas City TIPS Hotline at 816-474-TIPS (8477), TIPS may also be submitted electronically at http://www.KCcrimestoppers.com, or by downloading our NEW mobile app, P3TIPS, on Google Play or the Apple iOS stores for FREE. Information leading to an arrest and/or filing of charges could be eligible for up to $5,000.00 in reward money. ALL INFORMATION IS ANONYMOUS.

* A program of the KC Metropolitan Crime Commission

Raytown Schools get parents involved on potential plans for fall amid COVID-19

Raytown Schools get parents involved on potential plans for fall amid COVID-19

Jackson County releases recovery plan phases 2 & 3

  • click on image of the plan,  or download it, it is legible if displayed full size.

Jackson County Executive Frank White, Jr. – in consultation with Jackson County Health Department Director Bridgette Shaffer, MPH – today is announcing guidelines for phases two and three of the Jackson County Recovery Plan. Phase two guidelines are scheduled to take effect on June 1 but is subject to change based on local data of COVID-19 transmission in our community and key metrics being satisfactorily met.

A start date has not yet been determined for phase three, however, each phase is estimated to last at least 14-28 days.

“Our community understands the serious nature of this virus and continues to be diligent in protecting themselves and others from further spread of COVID-19. Their actions are allowing us to continue the reopening of our economy,” said Jackson County Executive Frank White, Jr. “I want to specifically thank the Mayors of eastern Jackson County for their input and partnership over the past few weeks.  They are deeply connected to the residents of their cities and have played an instrumental role in allowing us to re-open as quickly, safely and effectively as we have.”

Highlights of phase two include:

  • Gatherings of up to 50 people are allowed
  • Capacity limits for non-essential businesses, places of worship, weddings and funerals increase to 50% of the lowest occupancy load
  • Community centers, theaters, interior leisure venues, swimming pools and higher education campuses can reopen with limits
  • Graduations, organized/youth sports, overnight summer camps can resume with limits
  • Fairs, parades, festivals, playground equipment and K-12 schools remain closed

All open facilities are required to complete, post and follow social distancing procedures. In addition, the County strongly recommends that all residents stay six feet from others, encourages seniors and vulnerable populations to stay at home, working remotely if possible, and wearing a mask or face covering when in public.

 The Jackson County Health Department has prepared the phased-approach recovery plan that is focused on protecting the health and safety of residents, while beginning a safe and sensible path to economic recovery for all of Jackson County.

The Health Department will provide detailed guidance in the coming week. An overview guide of the Jackson County Recovery Plan can be found at www.jacksongov.org and www.jacohd.org.

 

MCPL Summer Library Program Kicks Off May 26

MCPL Summer Library Program Kicks Off May 26 

“Imagine Your Story” During 2020 Summer Library Program for Kids, Teens, & Adults 

Greater Kansas City, MO – Mid-Continent Public Library is pleased to announce the upcoming launch of its annual Summer Library Program, which encourages children to remain intellectually engaged while they are out of the classroom. From May 26 through July 31, participating kids and teens can earn free books and win great prizes by reading, attending virtual Library programs, and taking part in educational activities at home. Adults can also get in on the fun by modeling good reading behaviors.

This year’s theme, “Imagine Your Story,” invites participants to use their imaginations to explore new places and stories, allowing them to discover new worlds and perhaps gain inspiration for the future!

“Everyone knows that reading is important for growth and development, but stories can also serve in an aspirational capacity, showing kids different kinds of people and places that perhaps they could one day be a part of,” said Haley Lefholz, Youth Services Librarian at MCPL. “Whether their dream is to become a superhero or a super doctor, reading allows children to utilize their imaginations and explore new ideas.”

As in previous years, Summer Library Program participants can also win special prizes from the Library’s community partners, including the Kansas City Royals, Kansas City Chiefs, the Kansas City Symphony, and Science City. Participants who earn 1,000 points will also have the choice of another free book or a free t-shirt from Big Frog Custom T-Shirts. Kids and teens can earn points by:

  1. READING! (Reading is required to complete the program.)
  2. Completing fun, age-appropriate, educational activities at home (A complete list of learning activities is available online.)
  3. Attending virtual programs on the Library’s MCPL360 Facebook page 

While the Library’s branches remain closed to the public, participants are encouraged to use MCPL’s new curbside service to obtain physical reading materials, or to access digital materials through the Library’s website.

To find out more about Mid-Continent Public Library’s 2020 Summer Library Program, including instructions on how to enroll and participate, visit mymcpl.org/Dream.

State Rep. Jerome Barnes interviewed about his violence against referees law

 

 

Coach, referee pulled apart after punches thrown at youth basketball tournament in Lee's Summit

Raytown Mourns the Passing of Dale Paul Kensinger

 

Kensinger, Dale Paul of Newton, MA, formerly of Raytown, MO (January 15, 2020), age 78

Beloved husband of Jeannette (Pollard) for 46 years, devoted father of Elizabeth (Jon), loving grandfather of Juliet, uncle to Pam, Paul, John  Donna) Schwarm and Linda (Dave) Yelen. He is preceded in death by his sister and brother-in law, Betty (Al) Schwarm.

Dale was born on June 1, 1941 in Bakers’ Summit, PA, to the late Paul and Mabel Kensinger. He attended Morrison Cove High School, Juniata College, and the University of Pennsylvania Law School. He served as a Captain during the Vietnam War in the Air Force JAG Core at the Strategic Air Command (SAC) Offutt Air Force Base in Bellevue, NE. He worked for the Department of Treasury in Washington, D.C. and in Kansas City, MO. After his retirement, he became the inaugural director of the Low Income Tax Clinic at the University of Missouri, Kansas City. Later, when he moved to Newton, he volunteered weekly at the Tax Clinic at the Legal Services Center of Harvard Law School in Jamaica Plain, MA. He was a 2018 recipient of the ABA Tax Section Janet Spragens Pro Bono Award.

Dale was an avid reader, American history buff, lover of classical music, and baseball enthusiast. He enjoyed visiting different parts of the United States and savored time outdoors, whether working in the yard, reading on the porch, or taking his granddaughter to local parks, farms, and wildlife sanctuaries.

Funeral services will be held at 10am on Thurs Jan 23 at the Church of St Ignatius of Loyola, 28 Commonwealth Ave., Chestnut Hill, MA.

Fresh Fruit (and Nuts) Friday at Sutherlands

Have you see this van?

A video of a porch pirate stealing a package was uploaded to RING. While there was no good shot of the pirates face, the Van he was a passenger in seems to be identifiable. The back right side window are has some sort of logo or signage and the rear door seems to be unique. Here is a picture of some frames of the video.

Family of 10 left homeless by teens crashing stolen SUV into their house.

There was a flurry of alerts on the Ring Doorbell app the other night wondering what a loud boom was caused by. Well the mystery has been solved.  Teens stole a 2020 Jeep Grand Cherokee was stolen from Landmark Jeep in Independence and proceeded to crash it into a home near 53rd and Pitmann.  For more on this from Fox4KC..

Teens crash stolen SUV into Raytown home, displacing family of 10

 

Election Nov. 5th 2019

SAMPLE BALLOT
CITY OF RAYTOWN, MISSOURI
SPECIAL ELECTION
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2019
QUESTION 1
Shall the City of Raytown, Missouri continue to impose an existing sales tax at a rate of one-eighth (1/8) of one percent for the purpose of funding Local Parks/Storm Water Control within the City for a term of five (5) years? The monies received from the Local Parks/Storm Water Control sales tax shall be distributed with Local Parks receiving seventy-five percent (75%) and Storm Water Control receiving twenty-five percent (25%) for their respective functions.
YES
NO

Kansas City woman caught on video slashing on police cars in police parking lot after she was arrested the day before.

Eunice Fisher slashed the  tires on eight police vehicles in the  Raytown Police Department parking lot the day after her arrest on another matter.

Video tape of her in the act led to a quick arrest. 

For more on this click HERE for KCTV5 coverage of this story.

Man Barricades Himself After Shooting

On Sunday afternoon, 10-13-19, at about 1:13pm, Raytown Police responded to a residence in the 8800 block of East 85th Street, after receiving a call of shots fired. When officers arrived, they found one gunshot victim deceased at the residence. The victim had been shot outside the residence by a known suspect, who ran to the area of 8500 block of Kentucky and barricaded himself inside his residence. Police are currently on the scene at that residences attempting to make contact with the suspect.

UPDATE

The suspect is in custody but has not been charged at this time. Detectives are continuing to investigate.

Anyone with information about this incident is asked to call the TIPS Hotline at 816-474-TIPS (8477).

 

Raytown park where 17-year-old was killed now one of five parks getting security guards

From FOX4KC.com

Raytown park where 17-year-old was killed now one of five parks getting security guards

State Rep. Jerome Barnes Town Hall Meeting part 2 Medical Marijuana

This meeting took place months ago, and I am sorry it took me so long to recover it. The information is still valid and hopefully of interest to the readers.