raytownonline_circle

Raytown current weather conditions


Click for Forecast

Weather Forecast

The location could not be found.

Clark’s Appliances donated to REAP



Click on +1 button to tell Google you like RaytownOnline

Subscribe to RaytownOnline.com via Email

Enter your email address to receive emails of the latest local news articles on RaytownOnline.com.


Kendra donated to Shepherd’s Center

Ads for Charity

Proposed USE Tax = Mail order and Internet Sales TAX

The proposed “Use Tax” is a tax on items you order shipped to you. I found it hard to find any information about the specifics, so I did a little research and found a copy in the Board of Aldermen packet for Aug. 17th and will include it in this post. 

The city does need more income. This may help. I would suggest that more effort also be placed in getting real valuations for many business properties, especially on the 350 highway. 

I assume that this will mirror Missouri in not taxing prescription medicine, but will tax food. Missouri being one of the few states that does not exclude food from sales tax, but does exempt drugs if they are prescription. 


CITY OF RAYTOWN Request for Board Action​​ 

Date: August 12, 2021 Bill No.: 6579-21 To: Mayor and Board of Aldermen Section No.: III-A-9 From: Damon Hodges, City Administrator​​ 

Department Head Approval:​​ 

Finance Director Approval: ​​​​ ________________________​​ (only id funding is requested)

City Administrator Approval:​​ 

Action Requested:​​ Request approval of ordinance to authorize a question regarding a use tax to be placed on the November 2, 2021 ballot.

Recommendation:​​ Approve the Ordinance.

Analysis:​​ Pursuant to the authority granted by the provision of Sections 144.060 through

144.761 RSMo., the City of Raytown is authorized to ask voters to approve a use tax.

A use tax applies to purchases from out-of-state retailers. Currently, someone making local purchases pays the City’s sales tax rate of 2.50% on every purchase (1% General Fund, .50% Transportation Fund, .375% Capital Fund, .50% Public Safety Fund .125% Park Fund). ​​​​ The City currently does not have a voter approved use tax; therefore, any items purchased from a business located outside of Missouri does not require the business to collect and remit the local sales tax.

Adoption of a use tax would require that the same tax rate is charged on items purchased locally or online.

The City of Raytown took similar steps in August 2016, when voters were asked to consider an initiative dealing with out-of-state motor vehicle sales, trailers, boats, outboard motors and RV’s. Voters approved the continuation of the tax by 72%.

The Missouri Municipal League in conjunction with the Missouri Department of Revenue, has completed an extensive analysis regarding the potential revenue being lost across the State in those cities that do not have a use tax. A use tax would generate an estimated $400,000.00 annually, dependent on the City’s gross receipts.

Alternatives:​​ Failure to adopt this ordinance would leave the City without the funds.

Budgetary Impact:​​ 

Not Applicable

\\EDGE\administration\Board​​ of Aldermen Meetings\AGENDAS-BOARD OF ALDERMEN\Agendas 2021\08-17-2021\Ord Use Tax 2021 RBA.doc

BILL NO. 6579-21 ORDINANCE NO.​​ _______ SECTION NO. III-A-9​​ 

AN ORDINANCE IMPOSING A USE TAX AT THE RATE OF TWO AND ONE-HALF PERCENT (2.5%) FOR THE PRIVILEGE OF STORING, USING, OR CONSUMING WITHIN THE CITY ANY ARTICLE OF TANGIBLE PERSONAL PROPERTY PURSUANT TO THE AUTHORITY GRANTED BY AND SUBJECT TO THE PROVISION OF SECTIONS 144.600 THROUGH​​ 

144.761 RSMO; PROVIDING FOR THE USE TAX TO BE REPEALED, REDUCED OR RAISED IN THE SAME AMOUNT AS ANY CITY SALES TAX IS REPEALED, REDUCED, OR RAISED; AND PROVIDING FOR SUBMISSION OF THE PROPOSAL TO THE QUALIFIED VOTERS OF THE CITY FOR THEIR APPROVAL AT THE GENERAL ELECTION CALLED AND TO BE HELD IN THE CITY ON NOVEMBER 2, 2021, AND PROPOSING THE FORM OF THE BALLOTS TO BE EMPLOYED AT SAID ELECTION AND DIRECTING THE CITY CLERK TO DO ALL THINGS CALLED FOR BY LAW IN CONNECTION WITH THE HOLDING OF SAID ELECTION​​ 

WHEREAS, the City has imposed local sales taxes, as defined in Section 32.085 RSMo., at the rate of 2.50%; and,

WHEREAS, the City is authorized, under Section 144.757 RSMo., to impose a local use tax at a rate equal to the rate of the local sales taxes in effect in the City; and,

WHEREAS, the proposed City use tax cannot become effective until approved by the voters at a municipal, county or state general, primary, or special election; and,

WHEREAS, the Board of Aldermen of the City of Raytown, Missouri, has determined it would be in the best interests of the City of Raytown, Missouri to impose a use tax;

NOW THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED BY THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN OF THE CITY OF RAYTOWN, MISSOURI, AS FOLLOWS:​​ 

SECTION 1 – SUBMISSION TO THE VOTERS. Pursuant to the authority granted by, and subject to, the provisions of Sections 144.600 through 144.761 RSMo., a use tax is imposed for the privilege of storing, using or consuming within the City any article of tangible personal property. This tax does not apply with respect to the storage, use or consumption of any article of tangible personal property purchased, produced or manufactured outside this State until the transportation of the article has finally come to rest within this City or until the article has become commingled with the general mass of property of this City.

SECTION 2 – RATE IMPOSED.​​ The rate of the tax shall be two and one-half percent (2.50%). If any City sale tax is repealed or the rate thereof is reduced or raised by voter approval, the City use tax rate also shall be deemed to be repealed, reduced or raised by the same action repealing, reducing, or raising the city sales tax.

SECTION 3 – BALLOT FORM.​​ This tax shall be submitted to the qualified voters of Raytown, Missouri, for their approval, as required by the provisions of Section 144.757 RSMo., at the General Election hereby called and to be held on the 2nd​​ of November, 2021. The ballot of submission shall contain substantially the following language:

BILL NO. 6579-21 ORDINANCE NO.​​ _______ SECTION NO. III-A-9​​ 

FOR GENERAL ELECTION IN THE CITY OF RAYTOWN, MISSOURI ON TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 2021

“Shall the City of Raytown impose a local use tax at the same rate as the total

local sales tax rate, provided that if the local sales tax rate is reduced or raised by

voter approval, the local use tax rate shall also be reduced or raised by the same

action?”

¨​​ YES​​ ¨​​ NO

INSTRUCTIONS TO VOTERS

If you are in favor of the question, place an “X” in the box opposite “Yes”. If you are

opposed to the question, place an “X” in the box opposite “No”.

SECTION 4 – ADMINISTRATION. That any sales tax imposed pursuant to this ordinance shall be computed, imposed, reported, administered, collected, enforced and shall operate in all respects in accordance with the provisions of the Revised Statutes of the State of Missouri and upon such forms and under such administrative rules and regulations as may be prescribed by the Director of Revenue, any provision of this ordinance notwithstanding.

SECTION 5 – NOTIFICATION OF DIRECTOR OF REVENUE. Within ten (10) days after the approval of this ordinance by the qualified voters of Raytown, Missouri, the City Clerk shall forward to the Director of Revenue of the State of Missouri by United States Registered Mail or Certified Mail, a certified copy of this ordinance together with certifications of the election returns and accompanied by a map of the City clearly showing the boundaries thereof.

SECTION 6 – EFFECTIVE DATE OF TAX. That any sales tax imposed pursuant to this ordinance shall be effective on the first day of the applicable calendar quarter after the director of revenue receives notice of the adoption of the sales tax.

SECTION 7 – REPEAL OF ORDINANCES IN CONFLICT. All ordinances or part of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are hereby repealed.

SECTION 8 – SEVERABILITY CLAUSE. The provisions of this ordinance are severable and if any provision hereof is declared invalid, unconstitutional or unenforceable, such determination shall not affect the validity of the remainder of this ordinance.

SECTION 9 – EFFECTIVE DATE.​​ This Ordinance shall be in full force and effect from and after the date of its passage and approval.

BILL NO. 6579-21 ORDINANCE NO.​​ _______ SECTION NO. III-A-9​​ 

BE IT REMEMBERED​​ that the above was read two times by heading only,​​ PASSED AND ADOPTED​​ by a majority of the Board of Aldermen and​​ APPROVED​​ by the Mayor of the City of Raytown, Jackson County, Missouri, 17th​​ day of August, 2021.

________________________________

Michael McDonough, Mayor

ATTEST:

____________________________

Teresa M. Henry, City Clerk

Approved as to Form:

________________________________

Jennifer M. Baird, City Attorney

The Board of Aldermen voted on a resolution to Censure Alderman Greg Walters

Alderman Walters escaped censure by his fellow Aldermen by one vote. The final vote was 7 to censure, 2 against censure, and one abstention. The ethics rules require 8 of the 10 aldermen to vote to censure. 

Voting for censure of Alderman Walters:
Alderman Frank Hunt
Alderman Jason Greene
Alderman Jim Aziere
Alderman Janet Emerson
Alderman Ryan Myers
Alderman Mary Jane Van Buskirk
Alderman Bonnaye Mims

Voting against censure of Alderman Walters:
Alderman Derek Ward
Alderman Greg Walters

Abstaining from voting:
Alderman Bill Van Buskirk

R-3373-21: A RESOLUTION CENSURING ALDERMAN GREG WALTERS AS
APPROVED BY THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN OF THE CITY OF RAYTOWN, MISSOURI.
Point of Contact: Mayor Michael McDonough and Mayor Pro Tem Ryan Myers.

To the best of my knowledge Alderman Walters is the first to have a censure resolution directed at him. The full list of charges and evidence is part of the web packet on the city website. Skip to page 322 after you download the packet by clicking HERE

Included are the 5 pages of the resolution, but without the over 100 pages of supporting evidence. Please forgive the loss of formatting of this document. 

 

RESOLUTION NO: R-3373-21
Page 1 of 5
A RESOLUTION CENSURING ALDERMAN GREG WALTERS AS APPROVED BY THE BOARD
OF ALDERMEN OF THE CITY OF RAYTOWN, MISSOURI

WHEREAS, the City of Raytown (herein “City”) has a Code of Ethics and Conduct For
Elected and Appointed Officials (herein “Code of Ethics and Conduct”) that governs the conduct of
City Officials, to include the members of the Raytown Board of Aldermen (herein “Board”); and

WHEREAS, the Board members are bound to review this document, inform themselves of
its contents and to abide by its provisions in all interactions and communication with and about
other Board Members, City Staff, Mayor, and members of the public, including conduct during
Board of Aldermen meetings; and

WHEREAS, excellence in performance by Board members, City employees, and other
appointed board members, is the best way to achieve our common goal of ensuring quality of life in
Raytown. To be most effective, the efforts of all must be integrated. A special obligation of the
Board is to set a leadership example to promote cooperation. The public expects the best
communication, planning, and decision-making possible from its representatives and employees.
The Board must strive for high standards of behavior and performance to benefit all City residents.
Adherence to the City’s Code of Ethics and Conduct will ensure effective guidance and operation
of this Board of Aldermen and will accentuate a positive, open, and productive environment for all;
and

WHEREAS, each Alderman is required to keep an open and receptive mind toward the
views and opinions of others, raising concerns in private on a one-to-one basis before making
public comment; and

WHEREAS, each Alderman is expected to practice civility and decorum in discussions and
debate, be respectful of diverse opinions, honor the role of the Mayor, voice objections to the
Mayor or Chair’s actions politely and with reason, following parliamentary procedure, stay focused
and act efficiently during public meetings, refrain from politicizing procedural or ministerial actions,
and be courteous and respectful to City Staff; and

WHEREAS, governance of a City relies on the cooperative efforts of elected officials, who
set policy; and City Staff members, who analyze problems and issues, make recommendations,
and implement and/or administer the Board’s policies. Every effort should be made to cooperate
with and show mutual respect for the contributions made by individual City Staff members for the
good of the community; and

WHEREAS, a member’s responsibility does not entitle any Board member to monopolize
the City’s resources, usurp the judgment of the City Administrator or interfere with a City Staff
member carrying out his or her duties; and

WHEREAS, Board members should treat all City Staff members as professionals, channel
communications and concerns through the City Administrator, never publicly criticize individual
Staff or officers—instead, directing such concerns to the City Administrator—avoid involvement in
administrative functions, be cautious about communicating the City’s position on policy issues, and
rely upon City Staff to respond to citizen complaints and concerns; and,

WHEREAS, each Board member is accountable to the full Board for his or her actions; and

RESOLUTION NO: R-3373-21
Page 2 of 5

WHEREAS, it has come to the attention of the Board that Alderman Greg Walters has
engaged in a pattern of conduct that is or may be in violation of the Code of Ethics and Conduct
provisions set out above, among others, as it regards his interactions, in public and private, with
City Staff, fellow Aldermen, and others; and

WHEREAS, such conduct or pattern thereof is inappropriate; and

WHEREAS, the Board wishes to express its condemnation of the conduct and make clear
that all City Officials are bound by the Code of Ethics and Conduct.

NOW THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED BY THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN OF THE CITY
OF RAYTOWN, MISSOURI, AS FOLLOWS:

THAT, the Board finds that Alderman Greg Walters has engaged in acts that violate the
obligations of the Code of Ethics and Conduct in his interactions with the Board, City Staff, and
others over a period of months, as set out in Exhibit “A”; and

FURTHER THAT, Alderman Greg Walters is hereby censured for his conduct in violation of
the provisions of the Code of Ethics and Conduct as set out herein; and

FURTHER THAT, based on input from Aldermen, City Staff, and personal observations, the
assembled board finds the conduct of Alderman Greg Walters, as it regards fellow Aldermen, the
Mayor, the City Administrator, City Staff, and Citizens, to have violated the Code of Ethics and
Conduct as follows:

Recently, a complaint from a City employee was filed with the Mayor and City
Administrator in regard to your recent behavior toward them. The complaint indicates
that you have had communication with the Jackson County Board of Election
Commissioners regarding an incident that occurred in the City Administration office while
a candidate was filing for office. It is my understanding that you were not in the room at
the time of the incident. To send such a complaint, in such a manner, is in direct violation
of the City of Raytown Code of Ethics and Conduct, passed by the Board on November
19, 2019 as Resolution R-3254-19. Your actions violate Section B, Conduct Guidelines,
3. Elected and Appointed Officials’ Conduct with City Staff, Subsection C, “Never
publicly criticize an individual employee” (See Exhibit “B” and “C”).

To Wit: Alderman Walters communicated his complaint to the Jackson County Board of Election
Commissioners, instead of addressing the issue through the chain of command, through private
correspondence, to the Mayor or City Administrator Damon Hodges. This is unacceptable.

FURTHER THAT, in addition to the above violation, since joining the Board, Alderman
Walters has regularly violated other items from the Code of Ethics and Conduct as referenced
above. The Mayor has sent numerous memos/emails to Alderman Walters about how City
business is to be run. The Board has one City employee that answers to the Board: the City
Administrator. The City Administrator was hired by the Board of Aldermen to run the day-to-day
operations of the City. The Mayor has, on numerous occasions, written to Alderman Walters via
email of the need to follow the Board’s procedure for good governance (See Exhibit “D”). It is a
standard that is recognized by Fourth-Class cities with a City Administrator form of government
(See Exhibit “E”). The continuation of this behavior is unacceptable.
RESOLUTION NO: R-3373-21
Page 3 of 5

FURTHER THAT, since being elected, Alderman Walters has chosen to call City
Department Heads directly to ask questions. Even after multiple warnings, Alderman Walters has
ignored this request (See Exhibit “F”). The City Administrator has informed Department Heads, and
Department Heads are instructed, to contact the City Administrator and the Mayor should
Alderman Walters breach the chain of command in the future. The continuation of this behavior is
not acceptable.

FURTHER THAT, Alderman Walters has a propensity to show a pattern of behavior that
violates multiple sections of the Code of Ethics and Conduct document referenced both in letter
and spirit of the code. Below is a summary of each item within the Code of Ethics and Conduct
concerning Alderman Walter’s behavior to aid in ease of edification.

A. ETHICS
• Comply with both the letter and spirit of the laws and policies affecting the operations of
government; and
• Are independent, impartial, and fair in their judgement and actions; and
• Use their public office for the public good, not for personal gain; and
• Conduct public deliberations and processes openly, unless required by law to be
confidential, in an atmosphere of respect and civility.
“Therefore, the Mayor, members of the City’s Board of Aldermen, City Collector, and City Judge
and of all boards, committees and commissions shall conduct themselves in accordance with the
following ethical standards. For ease of reference the term “member” refers to any member of the
Raytown Board of Aldermen, Mayor, City Collector, Municipal Judge or city boards, committees
and commissions established by city ordinance or Mayor and Board of Aldermen policy.”

1. Act in the Public Interest.
• Recognizing the stewardship of the public interest must be their primary concern, members
will work for the common good of the people of Raytown and not for claims and
transactions coming before them (See Exhibit “G”).
Allowing accusations and misinformation to be posted on your blog about the parks
being unsafe or how employees do not do their jobs is not being a good steward of
the public interest.

2. Comply with both the spirit and the letter of the Law and City Policy
• Members shall comply with the laws of the nation, the State of Missouri, and the City of
Raytown in the performance of their public duties.

3. Conduct of Members.
• The professional and personal conduct of members while exercising their office must be
above reproach and avoid even the appearance of impropriety. Members shall refrain from
abusive conduct, personal charges or verbal attacks upon the character or motives of other
members of the Board of Aldermen, Mayor, Boards, committees and commissions, the staff
or public (See Exhibit “H”).

RESOLUTION NO: R-3373-21
Page 4 of 5

4. Respect for Process

• Members shall perform their duties in accordance with the processes and rules of order
established by the Mayor and Board of Aldermen (See Exhibit “I”).

11.Use of Public Resources
• Members shall not use public resources which are not available to the public in general (e.g.,
city staff time, equipment, supplies, or facilities) for private gain or for personal purposes not
otherwise authorized by law. All request for legal opinions shall be remitted to the City
Administrator, who will determine if matter should be forwarded to Legal Counsel. The
Mayor and Board of Aldermen, not individual members, shall give staff direction
regarding the allocation of city resources for substantial projects and modification to
City code (See Exhibit “J”).

14. Policy Role of Members
• Members shall respect and adhere to the Mayor and Board of Aldermen-City Administrator
structure of Raytown City government as outlined in the Raytown City Code. In this structure,
the Board of Aldermen determines the policies of the city with the advice, information and
analysis provided by city staff, boards, committees and commissions, and the public. Except
as provided by the City Code, members shall not interfere with the administrative
functions of the city, the professional duties of city staff or consultants to the city; nor
shall they impair the ability of staff to implement Board of Aldermen policy decisions
(See Exhibit “K”).

15. Independence of Boards, Committees and Commissions
• Because of the value of the independent advice of Boards, Committees, and Commissions to
the public decision-making process, the Mayor and members of the Board of Aldermen shall
refrain from using their position to unduly influence the deliberations or outcomes of
Board, Committee and Commission proceedings (See Exhibit “L”).
16. Positive Workplace Environment
• Members shall support the maintenance of a positive and constructive workplace environment
for city employees and for citizens and businesses dealing with the city. Members shall
recognize their special role in dealings with city employees to in no way create the
perception of inappropriate direction to staff.

B. CONDUCT GUIDELINES
1. Elected and Appointed Officials’ Conduct with Each Other in Public Meetings

(a) Honor the role of the chair in maintaining order
Elected and Appointed Officials’ Conduct with City Staff
(a) Treat all staff as professionals
• Clear, honest communication that respects the abilities, experience, and dignity of each
individual is expected. Poor behavior towards staff is not acceptable.

RESOLUTION NO: R-3373-21
Page 5 of 5
(b) Do not disrupt city staff from their jobs.
• Elected and appointed officials should not disrupt city staff while they are in meetings, on
the phone, or engrossed in performing their job functions in order to have their individual
needs met. Do not attend City staff meetings unless requested by staff – even if the elected
or appointed official does not say anything, his or her presence shows partiality, may
intimidate staff, and hampers staff’s ability to do their job objectively.
(c) Never publicly criticize an individual employee
• Elected and appointed officials should never express concerns about the performance of a
City employee in public, to the employee directly, or to the employee’s manager. Comments
about staff performance should only be made to the City Administrator through private
correspondence or conversation. Appointed officials should make their comments regarding
staff to the City Administrator or the Mayor (See Exhibit “C”).
Allowing/Encouraging blog responses criticizing employees is a violation of the
adopted Code of Ethics and Conduct.
(d). Do not get involved in administrative functions.
• Elected and appointed officials acting in their individual capacity must not attempt to
influence city staff on the making of appointments, awarding of contracts, selecting of
consultants, processing of development applications, or granting of city licenses and
permits.

FURTHER THAT, the Board is expressing its condemnation of conduct of Alderman Greg
Walters and the said violations to the Code of Ethics and Conducts for Elected and Appointed
Officials adopted pursuant to Resolution R-3254-19 on November 19, 2019; and

FURTHER THAT, the Board calls on Alderman Greg Walters to refrain from such behavior
brought forward in this Resolution in the future and to act in a manner which is in accordance with
the Code of Ethics and Conduct and uphold the dignity of his office.

FURTHER THAT this resolution shall be in full force and effect from and after the date of its
passage and approval.

PASSED AND ADOPTED by the Board of Aldermen and APPROVED by the Mayor of the
City of Raytown, Missouri, the 13th day of April, 2021.
________________________________
Michael McDonough, Mayor
ATTEST: Approved as to Form:
____________________________ ________________________________
Teresa M. Henry, City Clerk Jennifer M. Baird, City Attorney

April 6th Election information

Raytown is designated Brooking Township by the Jackson County Election Board. Polling locations are determined by what precinct in Brookings Township you live at. The map below will help you locate your precinct and the information below the map indicates where those precincts vote at. 

 

Raytown Poll locations

1,2,3 Raytown Library 6131 Raytown Rd
4,8 Connection Point at First Baptist Church 10500 E State Route 350
5,7 Raytown Central Middle School 10601 E 59th St
6,9,10,20 Laurel Hills Elementary 5401 Lane Ave
11,15 Raytown South Middle School 8401 E 83rd St
12,13,14,17,19 Raytown South High School 8211 Sterling Ave
16,18 Southwood United Church of Christ 7904 Raytown Rd

SAMPLE BALLOT
CITY OF RAYTOWN, MISSOURI
GENERAL MUNICIPAL ELECTION
TUESDAY, APRIL 6, 2021

FOR ALDERMAN – WARD 1
IAN SCOTT
JAYNE LOULOS
WRITE-IN

FOR ALDERMAN – WARD 2
TONY JACOB
LORETHA HAYDEN
WRITE-IN

FOR ALDERMAN – WARD 3
RYAN MYERS
WRITE-IN

FOR ALDERMAN – WARD 4
WILLIAM A. “BILL” VAN BUSKIRK
WRITE-IN

FOR ALDERMAN – WARD 5
BONNAYE MIMS
WRITE-IN

FOR MUNICIPAL JUDGE
TRACI FANN
WRITE-IN

FOR CITY COLLECTOR
LISA EMERSON
WRITE-IN

SAMPLE BALLOT
CONSOLIDATED SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 2

FOR DIRECTOR (Vote For Two)

AMY TITTLE
NATALIE JOHNSON-BERRY
ALONZO BURTON
DONNA PEYTON
WRITE-IN
WRITE-IN

Polling locations for Nov. 2020 election in Raytown

Prec. 

1,2,3,4 Raytown Central Middle School 10601 E 59th St

5,7       Our Lady of Lourdes Church 7045 Blue Ridge Blvd

6,10      Raytown City Hall 10000 E 59th St

8          Connection Point at First Baptist Church 10500 E State Route 350

9 **      Laurel Hills Elementary 5401 Lane Ave

11,15    Raytown South Middle School 8401 E 83rd St

12,13,14 *** Raytown South High School 8211 Sterling Ave

16         Southwood Church of the Nazarene 8201 Raytown Rd

17 ***    Raytown South High School 8211 Sterling Ave

18         Southwood United Church of Christ 7904 Raytown Rd

19 ***   Raytown South High School 8211 Sterling Ave

20 **     Laurel Hills Elementary 5401 Lane Ave

 

Below is a precinct map of Raytown for those who do not know which precinct they live in. It also should be on the card you got from the election board. 

AMENDEMENT 3 LEGISLATIVE REDISTRICTING

AMENDEMENT 3 LEGISLATIVE REDISTRICTING

OVERVIEW

Amendment 3 seeks to repeal the Clean Missouri redistricting reforms Missouri voters overwhelmingly ratified in 2018 that give the job of drawing new state legislative districts to a non-partisan state demographer and establish constitutional criteria that require districts to be drawn in a way that maximizes partisan fairness and competitiveness while minimizing the number of “safe” districts dominated by one political party.

Under Amendment 3, redistricting commissions consisting of members handpicked by the state Democratic and Republican parties would draw new districts. Creating districts that are competitive and fair would no longer be a top priority.

In addition, Amendment 3 would exclude children and other residents who aren’t eligible to vote from being counted for redistricting purposes, deviating from the practice of counting all residents that Missouri and every other state has followed since the nation’s founding. The change could result in some lawmakers representing substantially more actual residents than others, thus granting some communities disproportionate representation.

Republicans strongly opposed Clean Missouri and immediately after its ratification pledged to make repealing it a top priority. The Republican-controlled General Assembly placed Amendment 3 on the Nov. 3 statewide ballot with the passage of Senate Joint Resolution 38. The Senate approved it on Feb. 10 by a vote of 22-9 with a lone Republican joining unanimous Democrats in opposition. The House of Representatives voted 98-56 to grant SJR 38 final passage on May 13. Fourteen House Republicans opposed the measure while just one Democrat supported it.

Amendment 3 includes other provisions unrelated to redistricting that are included as enticements to win voter support. One would replace an existing $5 cap on the value of lobbyist gifts to lawmakers with a flat ban in most instances. The other would lower the limit on campaign contributions to Senate candidates from $2,500 per election to $2,400, while leaving contributions to House candidates unchanged at $2,000.

The coalition that championed ratification of the Clean Missouri amendment two years ago has mobilized to oppose Amendment 3, which opponents dub Dirty Missouri. As of Sept. 28, there had been no visible campaign in support of Amendment 3. While the Missouri Farm Bureau on Sept. 23 established a campaign committee to advocate for the measure’s passage, given the late stage of the election cycle, it’s unclear how aggressively Farm Bureau will engage and how much of an impact its efforts will have.

BALLOT LANGUAGE BATTLE

Although the Secretary of State’s Office usually prepares the ballot language for measures placed before voters, the General Assembly exercised its statutory prerogative to write its own ballot question as part of SJR 38. However, the Clean Missouri group immediately sued, alleging the legislature’s language was deceptive and intentionally designed to mislead voters.

The final ballot language prepared by the Western District panel, followed by the official fiscal estimate prepared by the State Auditor’s Office, which was neither challenged nor judicially altered, says:

Shall the Missouri Constitution be amended to:

• Ban gifts from paid lobbyists to legislators and their employees;

• Reduce legislative campaign contribution limits;

• Change the redistricting process voters approved in 2018 by: (i) transferring responsibility for drawing state legislative districts from the Nonpartisan State Demographer to Governor-appointed bipartisan commissions; (ii) modifying and reordering the redistricting criteria.

State governmental entities expect no cost or savings. Individual local governmental entities expect significant decreased revenues of a total unknown amount.

Because Attorney General Eric Schmitt, a Republican, declined to appeal to the Missouri Supreme Court on behalf of the state, the Western District’s rewrite is final and is what voters will see on the Nov. 3 ballot.

 

CLEAN MISSOURI REVIEWED

From 1966 until 2018, partisan commissions consisting of equal numbers of Democrats and Republicans got first crack at drawing new state legislative districts following each decennial U.S. Census. There were two separate commissions, one charged with drawing the 34 Senate districts with the other dedicated to creating the 163 House districts.

Although the governor appointed the commissions, he was required to pick members from lists of party loyalists submitted by the state Democratic and Republican parties, so his role in shaping the commissions’ membership was limited. If the partisan commissions failed to agree, which happened more often than not, the task passed to a special commission of six Missouri Court of Appeals judges chosen for the job by the state Supreme Court.

Clean Missouri, which voters ratified with 63 percent support in November 2018, created a new position of non-partisan state demographer and put that person in charge of legislative redistricting. The demographer is chosen by the top Democratic and Republican Senate leaders from among the applicants for the post. If the two leaders fail to agree, they can each eliminate one-third of the applicants from consideration, and the demographer is chosen by random lottery from among the remaining applicants.

While the partisan commissions still exist under Clean Missouri, their role is limited to reviewing the maps produced by the demographer. A commission can amend the demographer’s plan, but only if at least 70 percent of its members agree. If no changes are approved, then the redistricting maps are finalized as presented.

Under Clean Missouri, the top criteria for drawing districts is “partisan fairness,” which is meant to ensure that the number of legislative seats a given party holds is roughly equal to that party’s statewide popular vote total. The secondary goal is to enhance competitiveness to maximize the number of districts that are winnable by either party and minimize the number of districts where one party is dominant.

As has always been the case with previous redistricting systems, Clean Missouri requires districts to be roughly equal in population and consist of contiguous territory. While compact districts are preferred, compactness is subservient to other criteria.

If not replaced by Amendment 3, the Clean Missouri system is scheduled to be used for the first time next year when the process for creating new districts based on the results of the 2020 U.S. Census gets underway. The revised legislative districts will be used starting with the 2022 elections and ending with the 2030 elections.

PROPOSED AMENDMENT 3 CHANGES

Amendment 3 would eliminate the position of state demographer and restore the authority of the partisan House and Senate redistricting commissions. As with the pre-Clean Missouri system, if one or both of those commissions fail to agree on new district maps, then the redistricting task would be kicked to a six-member judicial commission chosen by the Supreme Court.

While the partisan fairness and competitiveness criteria would remain under Amendment 3, they would be the least important considerations when drawing new maps, with the focus instead on compactness and trying to keep districts entirely within municipal and county boundaries. Amendment 3 would allow for a deviation of up to 15 percent from the ideal when determining partisan fairness, which critics say could substantially exacerbate partisan gerrymandering.

Amendment 3 would delete an existing constitutional requirement that legislative districts be based of the total population of the state as determined by the last U.S. Census and replace it with amorphous language saying “districts shall be drawn on the basis of one person, one vote.” During legislative debate over SJR 38, the measure’s supporters said this change is intended to ensure that only eligible voters are counted when crafting new legislative districts, even though those excluded would still be entitled to representation. Such a limitation would prevent children, non-citizens and other Missouri residents who for whatever reason aren’t eligible to vote from being counted, thus arbitrarily skewing the populations of legislative districts.

In the event either the partisan or judicial redistricting commissions produced maps that violated constitutional requirements, Amendment 3 would erect new barriers to filing legal challenges by limiting who can bring such a challenge and severely restricting the ability of courts to declare redistricting plans unconstitutional. To have legal standing to challenge a redistricting plan, a voter would have to prove they would be individually harmed by it – a high legal bar – instead of merely showing a plan violated constitutional requirements.

During the last redistricting cycle in 2012, the state Supreme Court ruled a Senate map crafted by the appellate commission repeatedly violated a constitutional prohibition against splitting counties unless a county has enough population for more than one district. After tossing out the Senate map, the high court ordered the redistricting process to start over. Such a lawsuit might not be successful under Amendment 3’s restrictions on litigation.

ARGUMENTS IN SUPPORT OF AMENDEMNT 3

Missouri voters didn’t understand what they were voting on in 2018 and deserve a chance to reconsider before the next redistricting cycle in 2021.

The 2018 redistricting system will result in sprawling districts that connect areas with little in common. Amendment 3 will prevent that from happening.

Legislative districts should be drawn to represent specific local communities and the people who live in them, not carve up communities to achieve idealistic goals.

Clean Missouri was designed to ensure that more Democrats are elected to the legislature, giving them through the redistricting process what they have been unable to achieve at the ballot box.

There are no safeguards to ensure the so-called “non-partisan” state demographer doesn’t draw new districts that favor one party over the other.

Redistricting is too important a task to entrust to the judgment of a single, unelected person.

For more than five decades, Missouri legislative districts were drawn either by bipartisan commissions or appellate judges, and the system worked well. Amendment 3 would restore that system.

Requiring districts to be drawn based on “one-person, one vote” will provide better representation by focusing them on the number of eligible voters instead of total population.

ARGUMENTS IN OPPOSITION TO AMENDMENT 3

Missouri voters decisively said just two years ago that they wanted to reform the state’s legislative redistricting process to eliminate partisan gerrymandering. Their decision should be respected.

For Republicans to attempt to repeal the new redistricting system before it has even had a chance to be implemented is unconscionable and shows they fear that fair and competitive legislative districts will threaten their hold on power.

Clean Missouri constitutionally requires a non-partisan state demographer to draw districts that are competitive and fair without regard to partisan interests. Amendment 3 will return to a system that is controlled by the two major political parties for the benefit of the parties.
Republicans are willing to resort to deception in an attempt to trick voters into ratifying Amendment 3 by writing ballot language that completely failed to mention its primary purpose of repealing the Clean Missouri redistricting reforms.

Two separate courts declared the Republican legislature’s ballot language to be false and misleading and ordered it to be rewritten.

Provisions highlighted in the ballot language that reduce the value lobbyist gift to lawmakers from $5 to $0 and slightly reduce the maximum campaign contribution to Senate candidates are included in Amendment 3 solely to distract voters from its changes to the redistricting process.

Amendment 3 will exclude children and others who aren’t eligible to vote from being counted for redistricting purposes, denying fair representation to all Missourians who reside in undercounted districts.

Instead of requiring legislative districts to be fair and competitive, Amendment 3 would allow for partisan germanders that are even worse than what Missouri had under its old redistricting system.

Absentee Ballot information

Jackson County releases recovery plan phases 2 & 3

  • click on image of the plan,  or download it, it is legible if displayed full size.

Jackson County Executive Frank White, Jr. – in consultation with Jackson County Health Department Director Bridgette Shaffer, MPH – today is announcing guidelines for phases two and three of the Jackson County Recovery Plan. Phase two guidelines are scheduled to take effect on June 1 but is subject to change based on local data of COVID-19 transmission in our community and key metrics being satisfactorily met.

A start date has not yet been determined for phase three, however, each phase is estimated to last at least 14-28 days.

“Our community understands the serious nature of this virus and continues to be diligent in protecting themselves and others from further spread of COVID-19. Their actions are allowing us to continue the reopening of our economy,” said Jackson County Executive Frank White, Jr. “I want to specifically thank the Mayors of eastern Jackson County for their input and partnership over the past few weeks.  They are deeply connected to the residents of their cities and have played an instrumental role in allowing us to re-open as quickly, safely and effectively as we have.”

Highlights of phase two include:

  • Gatherings of up to 50 people are allowed
  • Capacity limits for non-essential businesses, places of worship, weddings and funerals increase to 50% of the lowest occupancy load
  • Community centers, theaters, interior leisure venues, swimming pools and higher education campuses can reopen with limits
  • Graduations, organized/youth sports, overnight summer camps can resume with limits
  • Fairs, parades, festivals, playground equipment and K-12 schools remain closed

All open facilities are required to complete, post and follow social distancing procedures. In addition, the County strongly recommends that all residents stay six feet from others, encourages seniors and vulnerable populations to stay at home, working remotely if possible, and wearing a mask or face covering when in public.

 The Jackson County Health Department has prepared the phased-approach recovery plan that is focused on protecting the health and safety of residents, while beginning a safe and sensible path to economic recovery for all of Jackson County.

The Health Department will provide detailed guidance in the coming week. An overview guide of the Jackson County Recovery Plan can be found at www.jacksongov.org and www.jacohd.org.

 

State Rep. Jerome Barnes interviewed about his violence against referees law

 

 

Coach, referee pulled apart after punches thrown at youth basketball tournament in Lee's Summit

Election Nov. 5th 2019

SAMPLE BALLOT
CITY OF RAYTOWN, MISSOURI
SPECIAL ELECTION
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2019
QUESTION 1
Shall the City of Raytown, Missouri continue to impose an existing sales tax at a rate of one-eighth (1/8) of one percent for the purpose of funding Local Parks/Storm Water Control within the City for a term of five (5) years? The monies received from the Local Parks/Storm Water Control sales tax shall be distributed with Local Parks receiving seventy-five percent (75%) and Storm Water Control receiving twenty-five percent (25%) for their respective functions.
YES
NO

State Rep. Jerome Barnes Town Hall Meeting part 2 Medical Marijuana

This meeting took place months ago, and I am sorry it took me so long to recover it. The information is still valid and hopefully of interest to the readers.

State Rep. Jerome Barnes Town Hall Meeting part 1

Real ID, Car Tags, and Taxes

Part 2 topic : Medical Marijuana

Periodic lane closure on Raytown Road for water main replacement

A water main replacement project will reduce Raytown Road to one lane of traffic in various locations between 87th Street and Bannister Road during construction working hours from now through August 2017. Expect traffic delays and plan accordingly.

This project is being done by Kansas City, not either one of the water companies that service Raytown.

Click HERE for more details on this project.

RaytownOnline Endorses Jerome Barnes for State Rep.

12931301_234329426915681_5495450049754522011_nJerome Barnes stands out as the only candidate who has a history of both working for our community and working for the Democratic Party. He is the only candidate that is not a stranger to working for Democratic issues and Democratic candidates.

He is a regular at the Raytown Democratic Association monthly meetings, where he keeps the membership updated on issues and events concerning the Raytown School District in keeping with his role as a member of our School Board.

Mr. Barnes has a long history of dealing with rules and regulations as a member of the US Army, the Postal Service, and the Raytown School Board. He is known for doing his homework and this experience and attention to detail will serve us well in Jefferson City.

Mr. Barnes chose Raytown to raise his family in 30 years ago and has a 30 year record of community service that has entailed working with people from all walks of life.

Jackson County, KCATA Agree to Funding Deal to Purchase Rock Island Corridor

Jackson County, KCATA Agree to Funding Deal to Purchase Rock Island Corridor

Jackson County nears deal with Union Pacific

Jackson County Executive Mike Sanders and Kansas City Area Transportation Authority President and CEO Joe Reardon announced a cooperative agreement today that will provide the financing necessary for the future acquisition of the 17.7 miles of the Rock Island Corridor from Union Pacific Railroad.

“This is an historic step forward for our entire community. The significance of this announcement, and its potential to shape our county’s growth for generations to come, cannot be overstated,” said Sanders.

Dozens of supporters attended the announcement at the Truman Sports Complex, including community leaders, proponents of walking and biking, trail enthusiasts, and transit supporters. Kansas City Mayor Sly James, Raytown Mayor Mike McDonough, and Lee’s Summit Mayor Randy Rhoads, whose communities will be directly affected, attended the announcement to show their support.

Katy Trail

Photo courtesy of Pat Ertz

 

“Imagine being able to leave your seat at the top of Arrowhead Stadium and get home before most cars leave the parking lot,” said Sanders. “Imagine the economic development in Kansas City, Raytown and Lee’s Summit spurred by trailheads and transit stops. Imagine connecting to the Katy Trail so that you can ride a bike from the Truman Sports Complex to the St. Louis Arch.”

The Rock Island project has received federal support in the past, and is ready for even more. U.S. Congressman Emanuel Cleaver hopes support comes soon.

“This announcement is a major step forward for our community,” said Cleaver. “This partnership shows the federal government what local communities can do with leaders like Mike Sanders and Joe Reardon. Now it is time for the federal government to do its part and support worthy projects like the Rock Island corridor.”

KCATA will provide part of the funding to acquire the corridor. The KCATA Board of Commissioners approved the cooperative agreement at a meeting shortly before the announcement.

“The opportunity to secure this invaluable corridor for public access and future transportation and development will benefit our entire region for years to come. We are excited about our partnership with Jackson County. I applaud Mike Sanders for his efforts to secure the Rock Island Corridor over the last four years without which we would not be where we are today,” said Reardon

While discussions with Union Pacific continue, the parties announced that they are nearing a final agreement.

“All major issues involving the acquisition of the Rock Island corridor have been agreed to. We anticipate having a final agreement very soon” said Sanders. “In addition, $10 million in federal funds has already been set aside to help clear the way for future construction on the trail.”

“Union Pacific is proud to be a partner in this project with Jackson County,” said Lindsey Douglas, Director of Public Affairs – KS & MO for Union Pacific. “We have addressed the major points related to the purchase of the Rock Island line and expect to finalize the agreement soon.”

The corridor extends from the Truman Sports Complex southeast to Lee’s Summit. With plans already in place to extend the Katy Trail from Windsor to Pleasant Hill, only a small gap will remain to connect the corridor with the Katy Trail.

“Connecting the Rock Island corridor to the Katy Trail will make that trail one of the longest in our country,” said Sanders. “The economic impact of the Katy Trail on mid-Missouri has been immense, generating almost $20 million annually for local economies.”

Over 56,000 residents, 23,000 households and 25,000 jobs are within one mile of the Rock Island corridor.

 

Blighted property now has two new energy efficient homes

Congressman Cleaver was present for the ribbon cutting and open house for two new homes in Raytown. The land previously contained two lots that the City had considered blighted. The new homes were constructed by Builders Development Corporation (BDC) and funding was provided through a Neighborhood Stabilization Program 3 (NSP#) grant the City of Raytown received from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. There are no local funds required by the City to participate in the program.

Using the NSP grant funding Builders Development Corporation purchases vacant and foreclosed properties to renovate or reconstruct on the properties and then sells the homes to qualified families. The program is part of the American Recover and Reinvestment Act also known as the Recovery Act was enacted to create jobs and promote invest and consumer spending during the recession. The monies made go back into the program to purchase more properties to further stimulate growth in the City and revitalization of a neighborhood.

Congressman Emanuel Cleaver, II – Missouri’s Fifth District, said “It is so satisfying to see homes built that will provide this neighborhood a new sense of excitement while also providing needed jobs to make the homes a reality. These homes will breath new life into this neighborhood turning blight into beauty and houses into hope.”

The BDC is also in the process of renovating a home that had been abandoned at 85th & Elm and is currently identifying other properties to acquire/reconstruct in Raytown.

 

 

burned_out_house_1024

Before

fixed house 2

After

hedges kitchen


The Kitchen

 

hedges cleaver and aldermen

Congressman Cleaver flanked by four members of the Raytown Booard of Aldermen

hedges cutting the ribbon

Alderman Melson cuts the ribbon

 

 

The Raytown Times response to Police Chief Lynch’s Letter to the Editor

Recently Police Chief Lynch submitted a letter to RaytownOnline.com. It met our standards and was published. In some ways it was cryptic, as it was in response to an article in the Raytown Times, that was not published on RaytownOnline.com.  The Raytown Times has given permission to reprint their piece on the matter of the Raytown Police Pension Fund. 


 

Raytown is indebted to the Police Pension Fund to the tune of $7.5 million and it could be 20 to 30 years, or more, before that debt is retired, depending on market fluctuations.

A third party hired by the Police Pension Board indicated the fund would have to show a 20 percent return annually to be fully funded, leading city officials to believe that the fund could no longer be sustained. Police Chief Jim Lynch disagreed with that assumption, holding that stock market gains would grow assets and require less contribution from the city.

In January 2014 the Board of Aldermen moved all current sworn officers of the police department into the Missouri Local Government Employees Retirement System (LAGERS) with other city employees. Officers who were vested with at least 10 years of service at the time of the change will continue to draw part of their pensions from the Police Pension Fund and part from LAGERS. The change will have no affect on retired officers, or widows, already drawing pensions.

The Police Pension Fund has been in existence since 1966. The city’s contribution to the fund grew through the years and remained 100 percent funded until 2000. The unfunded liability grew from about $74,000 in 2000 to more than 3.3 million in 2005. It ballooned to $7.5 million by 2014. In that six-year period, 2000-2005, the city ‘s contribution to the fund rose from $110,000 annually, or 6.7 percent of payroll, to nearly $420,000, or 17.8 percent of payroll. By December 2010 the city’s contribution to the pension fund grew to $747,643, or 25.1 percent of payroll, and city officials became worried about its sustainability.

Police officers contributed 3 percent of their pay to the pension fund up until 1999. The Board of Aldermen ended the practice that year, prompted by new rules from the Internal Revenue Service that prevented pension funds from piling up surpluses.

In 2004, a study showed that Raytown police salaries were the lowest of all surrounding departments and a 5.5 percent salary adjustment was enacted. For the next six years the salaries were raised annually by 5.5 percent, thus annually increasing the city’s contribution to police pensions. Those increases put the department into a competitive position among suburban departments.

There is discrepancy in how those raises were enacted, however. Lynch maintains the pay plan was approved by the Board of Aldermen in 2004. Approval by the city could not be found in city records.

The stock market collapse in 2008 immediately reduced the pension fund assets by $1.5 million, thus increasing the city’s contributions even more. Facing a budget bind, the city froze all city employee salaries in 2009, bringing an end to the annual 5.5 percent increases for police. All employees received a 3 percent increase in November 20 14, the first since the recession hit.

Normal retirement for police officers is 55 years of age with 20 years of service. The police department provided the Times a spread sheet showing a range of retiree pensions and the percentages of their pay at the time of retirement. Pension amounts range from $14,376 annually (22 percent of final compensation) to $79,800 (112 percent of final compensation). The lowest was a patrolman who retired early at the age of 46; the highest was a sergeant who worked nine years beyond his retirement age of 55. Pension benefits grow substantially when officers work over 20 years and past the age of 55.

In summary, city leaders felt strongly that the Police Pension Fund could not be sustained while police officials believed it could with improving market conditions. The two sides finally agreed to move police officers to the LAGERS plan, but philosophical differences between the two remain. It is important to realize that during the period from 2000 to 2014, the political landscape changed with new administrators and new elected leaders. All were factors in creating “The Perfect Storm” of controversy over the Police Pension Fund.

KCPL asking for a rate increase

KCPL Rate increase

Same-sex marriage licenses to be issued in Jackson County

This press release was dated Nov. 7th, 2014 and received by RaytownOnline.com in mid-afternoon.


 

Based on the ruling from the U.S. District Court of Western Missouri, the Jackson County Recorder of Deeds will begin issuing same-sex marriage licenses.

Beginning at 2 p.m. today, licenses will be issued at both the Jackson County Courthouse in Kansas City and the Truman Courthouse in Independence.

“Courts are ruling that marriage is a fundamental right of every citizen,” said Jackson County Executive Mike Sanders. “Given that marriage is such an important right, sound public policy dictates that right be applied uniformly across the state.”

“Marriage affords couples important legal protections, ranging from family leave, the ability to care for or visit a sick spouse, the opportunity to secure inheritances, or file for joint insurance,” said County Executive Sanders. “I am pleased that our staff is working expeditiously to accommodate applicants.”

Given the historic nature of this decision, retired Judge Vernon E. Scoville will be available to perform marriage ceremonies starting at 2 p.m. today. These ceremonies will be conducted in the Legislative Chambers of the Jackson County Courthouse in Kansas City.

Cold Weather Rules go into effect Nov. 1st.

PSC COLD WEATHER RULE TAKES EFFECT NOVEMBER 1
JEFFERSON CITY—The Missouri Public Service Commission’s Cold Weather Rule, designed to help customers with heat-related utility bills, begins on November 1, 2014. The rule will remain in effect through March 31, 2015. The Cold Weather Rule has been a part of the Commission’s rules and regulations since 1977.

The Cold Weather Rule applies to natural gas and electric utilities under PSC jurisdiction that provide heat-related service. Municipally operated systems, cooperatives and those that provide propane delivered by truck are not under PSC jurisdiction.

“The Cold Weather Rule contains a number of protections designed to help consumers keep the heat on during the winter,” said PSC Chairman Robert Kenney. “Consumers who have questions regarding the rule or who need additional information on the Cold Weather Rule are encouraged to contact our Consumer Services Unit at 800-392-4211.”

The Cold Weather Rule:
Prohibits the disconnection of heat-related service when the temperature is predicted to drop below 32 degrees during the following 24 hour period.

Provides more lenient payment terms permitting reconnection of service for natural gas and/or electric customers.

Prohibits the disconnection of registered elderly and disabled customers who meet certain income guidelines who make a minimum payment.

Allows a customer to register with the utility if:

o 65 years of age or older;

o Disabled to the extent that the customer has filed with the utility a form submitted by a medical physician attesting that your household must have natural gas or electric utility service provided in the home to maintain life or health; or

o The customer has obtained a formal award letter issued from the federal government of disability benefits.

Allows customers to budget payments over 12 months.

May allow customers to extend payment of pre-existing arrears beyond 12 months.

Contact: Kevin Kelly Phone: (573) 751-9300 Governor Office Building, Suite 600

FY-15-52
PSC NEWS
Missouri Public Service Commission

Does not require a deposit if payment agreement is kept.

Requires that customers be notified by mail 10 days before the date the utility intends to shut off service; that an attempt be made to contact the customer within 96 hours before the shut off; that an attempt be made to contact the customer right before the shut off; that notice is left at the home when service has been shut off.

Requires the customer be notified of possible financial help in paying the utility bill.

Allows for the reconnection of service for less than the full amount owed.

If a customer is faced with a heat-related utility bill that they cannot pay in full, it is important that the customer:
1) Contact the utility company.
2) State an inability to pay the bill in full.
3) Provide income information either by month or annual income.
4) Make a minimum payment.
5) Enter into a payment agreement.
It is important to note that in order to receive some of the benefits of the Cold Weather Rule; a customer must sign-up (register) with their heat-related company.
For more information on the PSC’s Cold Weather Rule, please see the Commission’s website at www.psc.mo.gov or call the Commission’s Consumer Services hotline at 1-800-392-4211. Consumers can also receive Cold Weather Rule information from their local natural gas or electric company.

 

Attorney General Chris Koster’s Speech at the annual Raytown Chamber Luncheon

Attorney General Chris Koster was the featured speaker at this years Raytown Chamber of Commerce Luncheon.  Most of his speech was non-partisan in nature, except when it came to health care.  Koster repeatedly hammered his position that it makes no sense to refuse to accept the $2 billion in federal funds that Missourians have actually paid $1.8 billion in taxes towards. That we get our money back, create health care jobs with it, and if the terms change in the future we can drop out of it.

AG Koster was an animated speaker, as the video below will show. Regretfully many times RaytownOnline did not follow his movements well enough to keep him inside the video frame.

Raytown Charter Commission time and location change

Charter Commission meeting today, Monday, at the Fire station, at 6:15PM as opposed to the normal 6:30.

Chamber Luncheon to feature Attorney General Chris Koster

 

Raytown Chamber of Commerce

MEMBERSHIP LUNCHEON

Wed. October 22

– Networking begins at 11:00am, Lunch at 11:30am

WHERE: First Baptist Church Atrium,

10500 E. 350 Highway
Enter “The Roc”-north doors

Featured Speaker

Missouri

Attorney General

Chris Koster

Letter to the Editor from Alderman Joe Creamer

It’s with great regret that I have to come to the people of Raytown about my personal life but there are people who feel it necessary to make issue of what is going on.

In the last year I have been separated from my wife and am currently in divorce proceedings. I am unable to maintain residency at my legal address because of issues that I prefer not to get into at this time. My legal residence is still 8808 E 66th st according to state statute. There is also legal opinion to back that. It is my intent to maintain residency at the above address after the divorce is final.

On August 5th I went to the polls as always to vote only to discover my name had been pulled from the voting rolls based on an investigation a former Alderman had requested be done by the board of elections. The poll worker called the headquarters to speak with an election official who conferred with legal counsel while I waited. It was determined at the time that I should be allowed be allowed to cast a ballot as I was displaced through things that were not in my control. I went to the board of election on Friday August 8th to prove my legal residency, along with documentation to show why I do not reside in my legal residence as well as divorce papers that list the house as the place where I intend to reside. There will be a formal hearing within the next week with legal counsel from the board of elections to prove my legal residence.

When I was unable no longer to stay at my residence I went to  former Alderman Greg Walters as a man and expressed what was going on I asked this him to keep my personal affairs out of the political arena and asked him to not use this as a political football. I expressed to Greg that if he had any question or concerns to please contact me and I would be happy to answer any questions. Rather than respect my request he chose to bring light to what is going on in my life.

Through all of what has gone on in my life I have worked hard to maintain a professional attitude and have continued to serve the people of Raytown in the capacity I was elected to. I don’t take the position lightly and intend to continue working not only for the residents of Ward 1 but for all of the people of Raytown.

My divorce court date is August 25th and I do hope to have everything resolved by then and soon after be reunited with my home. I miss my neighborhood as well as my neighbors and soon hope to be able to stand in the driveway and be able to visit with whomever passes by.

If anyone should have any questions in regards to what is going on please contact me at 816-517-4773. I will be glad to answer any questions as well as provide proof of what I have just written about.

Sincerely Alderman Joe Creamer

Michael McDonough Announces Bid for Mayor of Raytown

mike mMichael McDonough announced Friday, 08-15-14, his intention to run for Mayor of the City of Raytown.   Michael McDonough is dedicated to fostering an environment of cooperation within the City of Raytown.  He is committed to working alongside citizens and businesses to meet important community goals. For decades, Michael has served the public, his own neighbors, with integrity and dedication, in both public safety and local charity service, and is committed to our community’s progress.  The election will be held in April of 2015.

Michael, a nearly life-long resident, has achieved many accomplishments throughout his personal and professional life.  He was most recently honored to be named the Truman Heartland Foundation 2014 Raytown Outstanding Citizen of the Year.  As stated by the Truman Heartland Foundation’s press release announcing the honor, that recognition is reserved for those community members that have “used their skills, abilities, and positions to promote the wellbeing of their communities and the people that live in them. While the avenue towards change may be varied among them, all the honorees are united by a common goal, to improve the lives of their fellow citizens, and a common desire to help improve and enrich the communities of Eastern Jackson County.”

He donates his personal time to many charitable organizations and serves on the Board of Directors for Raytown Emergency Assistance Program (REAP,) the Raytown Police Benefit Fund, and was elected to a position on the Raytown Charter Commission. He was also involved at Southwood Elementary School for seven years in the Youth Friends Program.

His other accomplishments include having been an EMT with training in Emergency Care of Wounded Police Officers, Scouting, Coaching youth sports, and assisting other organizations with fundraising events.  He has received the Officer of the Year Award, twice, a Lifesaving Award from the Metropolitan Chiefs and Sheriffs Association, the James Schneider Award from the Raytown Fire Protection District, the Life Saving Star from Raytown Emergency Medical Services, as well as several Quality Contribution Certificates from the Raytown C-2 School District.

Michael McDonough has lived in Raytown for the past 51 years.  He grew up in Raytown, went through school here and graduated from Raytown South High School in 1973. He enjoys living in Raytown because of the great people that live here. They are so giving and helpful to one another, and just like him, are proud of this community. Although this town is surrounded by Kansas City, it has continued to keep its small town feel.

He has served as a police officer for the Raytown Police Department since 1975. Prior to that, he worked for a year in the City Street Department, while attending community college.  His passion has been, and always will be, serving the citizens of the City of Raytown. He has been serving his community for the last 40 years, and will continue to do so.  He continues to live in Raytown because of the people, and his love for this community.

It is that dedication and commitment to our community that has led Michael McDonough to decide to run for Mayor of the City of Raytown in the April 2015 election.  Michael would be honored to continue his service to the citizens of Raytown by leading the City of Raytown with a spirit of cooperation and progress.

Candidate Endorsements

RaytownOnline Endorses The Following Candidates

In the past RaytownOnline.com has limited political attention to candidates for the City of Raytown and the Raytown School District.  Recent events concerning the Jackson County Legislature granting property tax-free status and renewal of property free status at the expense of the income of the Raytown School District in the past, prompted broader political scrutiny for the sake of our community. 

Jackson County Legislature, 1st District at Large (Democrat) Sherwood Smith

Mr. Smith can point to a long history of involvement working for Democratic values and has the skills and knowledge that the job requires. His opponent has name recognition and a commendable history working with children, but needs more political experience before tackling a job in the often rough arena of the Jackson County Legislature.

Jackson County Legislature, 2nd District (Democrat) Sterling Brown

Mr. Brown lives in Raytown with his wife and children and has a history of supporting issues that help working class families.  The former 2nd District Legislator totally ignored the Raytown portion of his district and the odds are good that his hand-picked successor with do the same.

Jackson County Legislature, 6th District (Republican) Theresa Galvin

Ms.  Galvin seems knowledgeable and articulate.   It is hoped that Raytown will receive better attention from her than it has from the incumbent Bob Spence.  To Mr. Spence’s credit, he has attended a couple of Raytown Chamber of Commerce functions recently, but after many years in office, it is too little and too late.